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Types of Algae in Swimming Pools & Treatment

Algae is a common problem in swimming pools.  What is it; what are the different types & how is it successfully prevented and treated. First of all, algae is a single-celled plant form. Some are aquatic (live in water), some are not.  Algae utilizes the process of photosynthesis to manufacture its own food. Algae comes in very wide variety of colors and forms making it adaptable to almost any condition.

Although some forms are virulent, most are harmless and pose no more than a nuisance to most pool owners.

Download & print a FREE brochure on Algae Treatment.

Due to algae's microscopic size, it takes literally millions of these plants to accumulate to be noticed by the naked eye!  By that time it may be too late and very costly to correct.  Prevention of algae blooms is the best solution.  Click here for all of our Algae treating products.

The most common form of algae that we deal with in swimming pools is "green" algae.  Green algae (varies in color from blue-green to yellow-green to dark-green) can be free floating in the water (turning the water a hazy-green) or can be wall-clinging (patches of green).

Wall-clinging varieties range in severity from small patches on pool walls and bottoms to virtually covering the entire pool surface. Green algae has the ability to clog filters and may even cause surface damage if left untreated.  Green algae can be treated fairly simply and quickly with a proper, aggressive shocking & algicide.

A relative of regular green algae is "small-celled green algae" (SCGA). The difference is seen in these areas: 1. The water remains relatively clear.  Many treat the problem (without proper analysis) as a copper or mineral problem, however the metal chelants will show no effect.  2. When treating with chlorine, chlorine seems to "disappear".  SCGA is very resistant to even high levels of chlorine.

Other mid-summer types of green algae noticed is "green spots" all around the pool, especially in shady areas. The water is almost always "very clear".  The water can have a "stinging" sensation. This is normal green algae, typically brought about by lack of homeowner care; i.e. not following a weekly maintenance routine such as the Once-a-Week 3 Step program combined with very low pH and very low Total Alkalinity.

Treatment:  Have water properly analyzed. BALANCE THE POOL WATER.  Pools treated with chlorine or bromine should aggressively shock with chlorine (Burn Out® or Smart Shock®) and use a good quality algicide such as Back Up®, Algae All 60®,  or Banish® in extreme cases.  Pools treated with SoftSwim or other Biguanides should top up their Bactericide level "B", add a double dose of algicide "A", and add a double dosage of shock or "C".  Follow up either method with Optimizer Plus®.  Treating algae with Sodium BromideClick here for all of our Algae treating products.


"Black Algae" (actually blue-green algae) forms in cracks and crevices on pool surfaces, especially plaster finishes. We normally find black algae growing in, but not limited to, shady areas of the pool. Black algae is more typically found in concrete or plaster finished pools; it is very uncommon to find it in vinyl liner pools. It is known for a heavy slime layer and "skeletal growths" that make it impervious to normal chlorine levels.  As shown in the photograph, the water remains relatively clear, however, almost all customers notice a high chlorine demand (use much more chlorine than normal).

Since the end of 2009, we (and our customers) have found that using AquaFinesse Pool Water Care Tablets dramatically reduces the probability of Black Algae because it removes the biofilm that creates the base or the foundation for the Black Algae. Regular, continued use of AquaFinesse Pool Water Care Tablets is a great preventive measure against Black Algae.

Treatment:  Have water properly analyzed. BALANCE THE POOL WATER. Prior to and during treatment, the algae MUST be thoroughly brushed in order to "break open" the slime layer.  Failure to do this critical step will prevent the treatment from working.  Pools treated with chlorine or bromine should aggressively shock with chlorine (Burn Out® or Smart Shock®) and use a good quality algicide such as Back Up®, Algae All 60®,  or Banish® in extreme cases.  Pools treated with SoftSwim or other Biguanides should top up their Bactericide level "B", add a double dose of algicide "A", and add a double dosage of shock or "C".  Follow up either method with Optimizer Plus®.  Treating algae with Sodium BromideClick here for all of our Algae treating products.


"Mustard Algae" is probably the MOST misdiagnosed form of algae.  Mustard algae  is a chlorine-resistant form of green algae (yellow-green to brown in color)  typically found in sunbelt areas. It often resembles dirt or sand on the bottom or sides of a pool. When trying to distinguish between mustard algae or dirt, follow this common sense rule of thumb: if it feels gritty it's dirt; if it has slimy feel it's mustard algae. In our market area (Fairfield county CT), the number of TRUE Mustard Algae cases that we treat can be counted on ONE HAND in most seasons.  

Mustard Algae has certain characteristics: It can be brushed away very easily, but returns quickly to the same location. Keep in mind that the "algae" may be returning to the same place due to a dead spot in the pool.  Mustard Algae will also "climb" the pool walls; it will NOT simply stay on the bottom (this is where the confusion between dirt/dust and true Mustard Algae is realized).

Read more about dead spots and circulation here

Although it usually creates a large Chlorine demand, it has been known to survive in high levels of Chlorine.  It is extremely important to remove mustard algae growth from equipment (including the back of underwater lights & ladders) and bathing suits to avoid cross or recontamination of other pools. Pool equipment can be left in the pool during product application or cleaned separately with a mild cleaning solution. Rinse thoroughly if equipment is used in a SoftSwim® pool. Bathing suits should be washed with detergent as directed on garment label.

Treatment:  Have water properly analyzed. BALANCE THE POOL WATER. Prior to and during treatment, the algae MUST be thoroughly brushed in order to "break open" the slime layer.  Failure to do this critical step will prevent the treatment from working.  Pools treated with chlorine or bromine should aggressively shock with chlorine

(Burn Out® or Smart Shock®) and use a good quality algicide such as Back Up®, Algae All 60®,  or Banish® in extreme cases.  Pools treated with SoftSwim or other Biguanides should top up their Bactericide level "B", add a double dose of algicide "A", and add a double dosage of shock or "C".  Follow up either method with Optimizer Plus®.  Treating algae with Sodium BromideClick here for all of our Algae treating products.


Treating algal blooms with Products containing Sodium Bromide (products such as Yellow Out, Yellow Treat, Mustard Free, Defense or Drive Out) should be done cautiously, and definitely NOT in biguanide (SoftSwim or Baquacil) treated swimming pools.  Adding sodium bromide (as little as 0.5 ppm) to pools treated with chlorine can cause high chlorine demands and will cause the chlorine to become unstable, increasing chlorine consumption.  Since sodium bromide cannot be removed from the water, you effectively transform the pool to a "bromine" treated pool.  Unfortunately, many consumers may not be aware of the increased chlorine demand and may not check chlorine levels as often as necessary. This could result in a drop in the chlorine level leading to subsequent Algae blooms.

Q.  My pool looks really nasty.  Shouldn't I just drain it, clean it & refill it, starting fresh?
A. NO.
NEVER DRAIN your pool.  The liner will shrink, voiding the warranty and could cause damage to your pool.  In gunite, plaster, or even fiberglass pools removal of the water from the pool could result in the pool structure "floating" and causing serious damage to the structure.

If you still need help, here's how to reach us:

Telephone (during store hours): Stratford  203-377-0100
                                             
FAX: (24 hrs) 203-375-7787
Email: techhelp@parpool-spa.com

 

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